Some creative ways to use Apple peels

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An apple a day really could keep the doctor away – as long as you don’t throw away the peel. This is because apple peel packs most of the fiber. Apple peels can also ease breathing problems.

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Therefore, think twice before you throw out apple peels! Here are some ideas for how to use up all the apple peels 🙂

1. A refreshing drink

Apple peels can be made into a refreshing drink warm or cold.
Put the apple peelings into a pan with enough water to cover the peelings plus about an extra centimetre. Add a dash of lemon juice and bring to a soft boil. Simmer until the peelings are soft. Strain the contents of the pan in a sieve pressing down until no more juice comes out. The juice can be sweetened to taste. More water can be added if the juice is too strong.

2.Make jelly

Place about 3-4 inches of apple peels, lightly packed, into a 4.5 qt. pot with 5 cups of water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and boil for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat, put the lid on the pot, and allow to stand overnight. (Optional, add a cinnamon stick when you let it sit overnight.)

Strain the liquid into a measuring cup, and make certain you have 5 cups. Return to the pot. Gradually dissolve 1 box of pectin into the liquid and bring to a full rolling boil, over high heat. Add 7 cups of sugar (all at once), stirring to dissolve. Return to boiling, and boil hard for 1 minute.

Remove from heat, skim foam if necessary, and pour into hot 1/2 pint jelly jars. Process in a hot water bath for 10 minutes.

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3. Apple Tea

6 apple peels
3-4 C water
1/2 tsp. cinnamon (or 1 cinnamon stick)
1 T honey
1 T lemon juice

Place apple peels in a sauce pan. Cover with water and lemon juice and cinnamon.
Bring to a boil for 10-15 minutes, until liquid is colorful and appley.
Strain out the apple peels using a colander positioned over a large bowl. Then, add in the honey. Taste… add additional honey or cinnamon to taste.
If you are serving right away, you may choose to add a cinnamon stick in place of ground cinnamon.

4.Add to oatmeal:

Store peels in the freezer and add them to simmering oatmeal along with raisins and cinnamon. For a finer texture, process the peels in a blender first.

5.Clean aluminum cookware

The acid in the apple peels will remove stains and discoloration from aluminum cookware. Fill the pan with water and apple peels, bring to a boil then simmer for about 30 minutes. This is less expensive and much safer to use, especially with children in the house!!

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If you have any leftovers and not sure what to do with them or forgotten foods in the fridge, tell us and we’ll try to come up with some ideas for you! 🙂

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Leftover wine? What’s that?

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I know, I know, leftover wine – What is that??

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It doesn’t happen often, but sometimes we find ourselves with some extra wine at the end of the evening that we know we’re not going to drink within the next several days…but what should we do with it?

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If you have leftover wine and don’t want to waste it, here are some useful tips!

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1. Freeze it

Pour leftover wine into ice cube trays and freeze it to use in future recipes. Most recipes will call for a cup of wine to be reduced into a sauce or a stew. If you save your wine in standard ice cube trays, a cup of wine will be about 10-12 cubes.

2.Make vinegar

Simply pour the leftover wine into a well-washed mason jar and cover with a couple of layers of cheesecloth (to prevent dust or bugs from getting into it). Then, just store it in a cool, dark place for a month to six months. Taste it periodically to determine when it has turned to vinegar then transfer it to a bottle with a stopper and store in the pantry. How easy is that?!

3.Wine Syrup

Mix leftover wine with sugar and reduce it down to a rich syrup that can be poured over fruit, ice cream, and pancakes, or mixed into marinades and salad dressings.

4. Cook with it

Add it into stews/ soups. A cup or two of leftover wine is all you need to turn out a comforting winter meal the day after the party.

5. Wine Jelly!!!

Take your wine syrup one step further by adding pectin and turning it into wine jelly — just the thing to serve with cheese at your next party.

6. Red wine lollipops

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It doesn’t look like the easiest recipe…but if you make these, you’ll definitely impress your foodie friends!

Yield: About 12 lollipops

∙ 1 ½ cups plus 2 tbsp Port wine
∙ 3 tablespoons corn syrup
∙ ¾ cup sugar
∙ ⅛ tsp. kosher salt
∙ 12 Lollipop sticks
∙ Gold luster dust *optional

1. Bring red wine to a simmer in a small saucepan. Simmer wine until reduced to ⅓ cup, this should take about 20-25 minutes. Remove from stove-top and let cool completely.

2. In a medium saucepan combine sugar, corn syrup, salt and wine reduction. Stir until combined. Clip a candy thermometer to the side of the saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Stir occasionally with a heat-proof spatula until all sugar granules have dissolved. Boil until candy temperature registers 298-310° on a candy thermometer.

3. Remove from heat and fill greased lollipop molds with the hot candy. Place lollipop sticks in the stick crevices and rotate until the stick is coated in the hot candy. Alternatively, you may also drop the hot candy from a spoon onto a silicone mat or parchment paper, making two to three-inch disks and leaving room to place -and rotate- the lollipop sticks.

4. Allow the lollipops to harden completely. These are best if you wait a day to consume them, as this gives the red wine flavor plenty of time to develop.

5. Embellish with luster dust if desired and store between sheets of parchment in an airtight container.

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What do you do with leftover wine — if such a thing exists in your household?

How to use up leftover MILK

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Do you ever struggle to use up the milk in your fridge?
Sometimes we buy milk for a recipe or a weekend brunch, and then it lingers in the fridge, half-used, with the expiration date barreling down upon our guilty heads. It’s a sad waste to pour expired & sour milk down the drain…but you never need to do that again.
Here are some simple ways to use up leftover milk before it goes off; before it becomes actual waste!

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1. Got too much milk? Freeze It for Later!

A few of things to keep in mind when freezing milk:

Allow for expansion: Freeze milk in moisture- and vapor-resistant containers with 1 to 1 1/2 inches of space at the top to prevent bursting.

Thaw it safely: Place the frozen milk in the refrigerator to thaw. Depending on the size of the container, it may take a day or longer to defrost.

Shake it up: Freezing may cause the milk to separate and develop a grainy texture. To restore some smoothness, you can stir, shake, or beat it with a hand mixer or immersion blender.

Because of the potential changes in quality and texture, frozen milk is often better for cooking and baking than straight drinking.

2. A nice glass of Chilled Milk with Chai Tea Ice Cubes

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Chai-spiced tea cubes served in a glass of icy-cold milk. The ice cubes are made of strong black tea steeped with whole spices and ginger. Plunked into a glass of cold milk (or non-dairy milk), they slowly melt, transforming into a glass of iced chai tea that gradually gets stronger. Yum!

3.Homemade Ricotta Cheese

ricotta cheeseMilk, lemon juice, and about half hour of your time — that’s all you need to make a batch of fresh, creamy homemade ricotta.

What You Need:

Ingredients
1/2 gallon whole milk, not UHT pasteurized (see Recipe Notes)
1/3 cup lemon juice (from 1 1/2 to 2 lemons), 1/3 cup distilled white vinegar, or 1/2 teaspoon citric acid (available from cheese-making suppliers)
1 teaspoon salt, optional

Equipment
4-quart pot
Instant read thermometer or candy thermometer
Measuring spoons
Cheese cloth
Strainer
Mixing bowl
Slotted spoon

Instructions

  1. Warm the milk to 200°F: Pour the milk into a 4-quart pot and set it over medium heat. Let it warm gradually to 200°F, monitoring the temperature with an instant read thermometer. The milk will get foamy and start to steam; remove it from heat if it starts to boil.
  2. Add the lemon juice and salt: Remove the milk from heat. Pour in the lemon juice or vinegar (or citric acid) and the salt. Stir gently to combine.
  3. Let the milk sit for 10 minutes: Let the pot of milk sit undisturbed for 10 minutes. After this time, the milk should have separated into clumps of milky white curds and thin, watery, yellow-colored whey — dip your slotted spoon into the mix to check. If you still see a lot of un-separated milk, add another tablespoon of lemon juice or vinegar and wait a few more minutes.
  4. Strain the curds: Set a strainer over a bowl and line the strainer with cheese cloth. Scoop the big curds out of the pot with a slotted spoon and transfer them to the strainer. Pour the remaining curds and the whey through the strainer. (Removing the big curds first helps keep them from splashing and making a mess as you pour.)
  5. Drain the curds for 10 to 60 minutes: Let the ricotta drain for 10 to 60 minutes, depending on how wet or dry you prefer your ricotta. If the ricotta becomes too dry, you can also stir some of the whey back in before using or storing it.
  6. Use or store the ricotta: Fresh ricotta can be used right away or refrigerated in an airtight container for up to a week.Leave us a comment and left us know how you use up leftover milk!

Household food waste

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According to research, young consumers and households with children are the biggest food-wasters. I don’t imagine many people do it on purpose. It can be a result of habits, lack of awareness and knowledge, and in some cases–laziness.

Indeed, it is easier to just throw away the chicken carcass in the bin than taking time to make your own chicken stock and  soup for another day with it.

BUT food waste does not only have a negative impact on the environment. Wasting food is also a waste of money–$2.5 billion worth of edible food a year is thrown away by households in NSW. Per household this averages out to $616 each year of money spent on food that is never eaten. I’m sure all of us could think of lots of other ways that we would prefer to spend our money instead!

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Now that concern over household budgets is constantly in the news and that living costs are rising faster than income, why do we still waste so much? Why is it so hard to eat the food we buy? Reducing food waste can save money!

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If you have made too much for dinner, put in the fridge for another time. Don’t throw it away.

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If you don’t want to have the same thing two days in a row, put it in the freezer and you have a quick meal ready in the week!

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Educate your children & the younger generation. Teach them to appreciate& be grateful for food and not to waste food.

Become a FOOD LOVER, not a FOOD WASTER. Say “NO” to food waste and stop wasting!


Be Grateful, Not Wasteful

800, 000 tonnes of edible food, which is worth $2.5 billion, gets wasted by households (particularly young consumers aged 18-24 and households with children) in NSW each year.

Why do we waste so much food?

Edible food being thrown away by households in NSW due to a lot of reasons and the main reasons are the following:

– Lack of skills and knowledge – Some people do not know how to store and handle food properly or what to do with leftovers; some people are confused about “best before” and “use by” date labels.

– Poor planning/food management — Excess buying and portion over-estimation always result in food getting wasted. Australians discard up to 20% of the food they purchase, which is one out of five bags of groceries they purchase (Food Know How 2014)

– Personal choice and lifestyle — Edible food being thrown away simply because it does not look right, leftovers being thrown away, and people buying takeaways instead of cooking what they have in their fridge, etc.

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But aren’t we so lucky to have access to amazing quality produce and food in Australia?

We should appreciate food and be GRATEFUL,not WASTEFUL!

Show our food some love, finish it all! Don’t Waste!

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